Samsung Galaxy S III

by Fairul Hafifi

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Samsung Galaxy S III, is this what you looking for?Now, the best smartphone in the world is the Samsung Galaxy S III.
The phone hardware itself is better than the iPhone 4S. The combination of extremely solid hardware design and generally excellent build quality make the Galaxy S III the best phone that you can buy today.

The GS3 is a very large handset, but also slim and light. The weight doesn’t match the size – it feels lighter than it should, but that’s not a bad thing. The airy inside makes the large phone more comfortable to hold for long periods, something I’ve done very much of. The GS3 is also the first of Samsung’s Android phones to be identical across the world, for the most part. The US model is only different from the Asian and European model by including an LTE chip, which still isn’t widely available outside of the US.

It’s actually the most similar phone to an iPhone there is, except besides for the Palm Pre. The GS3 has a home button and a power/standby button, though only the latter is properly built. The home button is long across, and doesn’t fit the thumb’s profile making it annoying to press, though uncomfortable at most.

The volume rocker on the left and power/standby button on the right are both well built and comfortable to press. The charging port is where it belongs, on the bottom of the phone, while the loudspeaker is a tiny, scratchy cheese grater beside the 8MP camera. It actually does look pretty stunning once you get your hands on it. For anyone who has stated that it’s ugly and built worse than previous models, that’s an outright fabrication. The plastic shell is flimsy and a little slippery, but completely functional.
On that note, the back cover truly is a flimsy little piece of plastic. It’s surprisingly elastic, but flimsy feeling and looking nonetheless. The GS3 only comes in a 16GB version now, but also includes a MicroSD card slot, so users can get up to 48GB of space, much more than is generally required for a phone.

Inside the phone is just as pretty. The GS3 has the same dual-core 1.5GHz ARM processor as the HTC One X, which is very powerful. The 720p display, at 4.8?, has a high DPI rate of 300+ (305×304), and though complaints have been widespread about pentile displays, Samsung has made it work. Not only does picture quality look excellent, the display is a pleasure to use and to gaze upon. Except in bright conditions, where the panel seriously struggles, like the previous Galaxy phones, to be visible.

Inside the Exynos 4 SoC is extremely powerful as you’ll see in the benchmarks below. Besides for the glossy and flimsy back, the Galaxy S III is one of the finest phones there is, with two serious mistakes: the display, while excellent for a pentile screen, lacks brightness and doesn’t have the appealing color contrast we’ve come to expect from Galaxy S phones. And, of course, the rear panel.

Additional software benefits over other Android devices include instant on/off switches for all of the major phone functions, like Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, GPS, etc. all in the drop-down menu. Notifications are split in two, with Wi-Fi always showing which network you’re connected to (and a tap on that will open the network surroundings for quickly switching between networks). Built-in media applications will also allow for instantly continuing playback, like Play Music, so you don’t have to open the app directly to continue a paused song.

There are some slight differences between the AT&T and Verizon model here, specifically with Wi-Fi. Verizon’s doesn’t allow for instantly turning Wi-Fi on and off, instead leaving the ongoing Wi-Fi notification there at all times when both not connected (prompting users to enable Wi-Fi or to connect to a local network) and when connected.

Overall the software is excellent, but not quite as good as it can be. There’s no word yet when the GS3 will update to Android 4.1, but those updates are few and not crucial.

 

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